Home - AdRespect Advertising Media Program
leftendAbout the AdRespect Advertising Media ProgramAdRespect Advertising Media Program Ad LibraryAdRespect Advertising Media Program ResourcesDonate to the AdRespect Advertising Media ProgramContact AdRespectJoin the AdRespect Advertising Media ProgramMember logon to the AdRespect Advertising Media ProgramAdRespect Advertising Media Program
spacer
paid advertisement

AdRespect Ad Library Profile

View larger version of the video Members Only!  Download video!
Save as a Favorite

Company: Nextel Communications
    View Company Scorecard / Contact Company
Brand: Nextel
Ad Title: George Lopez
Business Category: Telecommunications
Media Outlets: Television
Country: United States
Region: North America
Agency: Mullen
Year: 2003
Target: Mainstream
Ad Spotter: Franco Cefalo
none

Theme(s)

Insufficient Masculinity/Femininity

Miscellaneous Stereotype

GLBT Punch Line

Theme Breakdown

AdRespect Score: 
none

Featuring TV host George Lopez, this campaign for Virginia-based Fortune 300 company Nextel is part of a celebrity campaign that also features Eric McCormack of "Will & Grace," film actor Rob Lowe and Kristin Davis of "Sex & the City."

The campaign is supposed to feature "true-to-life scenarios from their personal and business lives" according to a press release. The spots employ a split screen to illustrate each celebrity's life with and without the Nextel phone simultaneously.

In this spot, Lopez calls his daughter because he needs his car back. In one screen, he is forced to drive her pink VW Beetle with a license plate that reads "Boycrazy." He pulls up to a stoplight, where a car full of guys pull up next to him and give him the eye and he turns away.

Through its ad agency, Mullen Advertising, Nextel declined an interview about its commercial, saying it did not intend gay innuendo, but offers a written statement: "The humorous effect in the George Lopez spot comes from his embarrassment at being stuck in his daughter's outrageous car? Her pink bug with the license plate is typical for a teenage girl, but embarrassingly out of place for a middle aged, successful guy with his image to consider."

They left out the part about his concern for being "Boycrazy." This ad plays on the tension of his being stereotyped as gay by casual bystanders.

none

Be the first to comment on this ad!
none


none

Submit An Ad Test An Ad Rate An Ad Post Comments
space
© 2001 - 2014 AdRespect Advertising Education Program. All rights reserved.
Other works which appear on this site are the property of their various owners and are used for educational purposes, with no commercial intent.
space
Legal Statement and Terms of Use
Designed & Powered by Videotex


paid advertisement
paid advertisement